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Geographic Profile Report

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New York City is a city of neighborhoods, each with its own character and needs. And the same is true of Long Island and Westchester — each town has its own unique personality. To understand more about the Jewish population and its similarities and differences area by area, we present the Jewish Community Study of New York: 2011 Geographic Profile, which provides detail on population size, growth, diversity, Jewish engagement, and vulnerable Jewish populations for each county as well as for 30 individual neighborhoods.

Geographic Profile (PDF)
Entire volume, with all the sections. Updates and corrections as of October 15, 2013, are incorporated into all PDFs on this page.

Executive Summary (PDF)
Highlights of key findings.

Introduction (PDF)
Why and how the Geographic Profile was developed, including criteria used for selecting primary Jewish areas, notes on how data is presented, and how to read and use the data in this report.

Chapter 1: Eight-County Overview (PDF)
Estimates of the number of Jewish households, Jews, and people in Jewish households in 2011 and changes since 2002 for the eight-county area and by county.

Chapter 2: The Bronx (PDF)
Narrative and statistical profile of the entire county and its primary Jewish area — Riverdale/Kingsbridge.

Chapter 3: Brooklyn (PDF)
Narrative and statistical profile of the entire county and its primary Jewish areas — Coney Island/Brighton Beach/Sheepshead Bay, Bensonhurst/Gravesend/Bay Ridge, Kings Bay/Madison, Flatbush/Midwood/Kensington, Borough Park, Williamsburg, and Brownstone Brooklyn.

Chapter 4: Manhattan (PDF)
Narrative and statistical profile of the entire county and its primary Jewish areas — Lower Manhattan East, Lower Manhattan West, Upper East Side, Upper West Side, and Washington Heights/Inwood.

Chapter 5: Queens (PDF)
Narrative and statistical profile of the entire county and its primary Jewish areas — Forest Hills/Rego Park/Kew Gardens area, Kew Gardens Hills/Jamaica/Fresh Meadows area, Flushing/Bay Terrace/Little Neck area.

Chapter 6: Staten Island (PDF)
Narrative and statistical profile of the entire county and its primary Jewish area — Mid–Staten Island.

Chapter 7: Nassau (PDF)
Narrative and statistical profile of the entire county and its primary Jewish areas — Great Neck, Roslyn/Port Washington/Glen Cove/Old Westbury/Oyster Bay area, Plainview/Syosset/Jericho area, Merrick/Bellmore/East Meadow/Massapequa area, Oceanside/Long Beach/West Hempstead/Valley Stream area, and Five Towns.

Chapter 8: Suffolk (PDF)
Narrative and statistical profile of the entire county and its primary Jewish areas — Commack/East Northport/Huntington area, Dix Hills/Huntington Station/Melville, and Smithtown/Port Jefferson/Stony Brook area.

Chapter 9: Westchester (PDF)
Narrative and statistical profile of the entire county and its primary Jewish areas — South-Central Westchester, Sound Shore Communities, River Towns, and North-Central and Northwestern Westchester.

Appendix A: Maps of Selected Variables by Geographic Area (PDF)
Graphic representation of the geographic distribution of selected variables.

Appendix B: Listing of Selected Variables, Ordered by Geographic Area (PDF)
Selected variables, ranked according to their values from highest to lowest, enabling easy comparison of geographic areas.

Appendix C: Definition of Geographic Areas by ZIP Code Clusters (PDF)
Listing of ZIPs that define 2011 primary and secondary areas.

Appendix D: Community District Maps (PDF)
Community-planning district maps for New York City’s boroughs.

Appendix E: Research Methodology (PDF)
Overview of the research process, sampling design, and weighting and estimation process; sampling and survey response error; assessment of the comparability of 1991, 2002, and 2011 New York Jewish community studies; criteria used to select primary and secondary areas; and unweighted count of interviews and margins of error calculations by area.