Caring for People in Need

CARING FOR
HOLOCAUST SURVIVORS

We’re keeping our promise to never forget and never abandon.
Aging Holocaust survivors require more nuanced care. The terrible trials they suffered in their earlier years, like malnutrition, can intensify the typical challenges that come with advanced age. The loss of a spouse or longtime friend can trigger traumas experienced in the past.
That’s why our Community Initiative for Holocaust Survivors helps fund individualized, home-based care in Israel and New York.
We’re helping survivors avoid institutionalization, which is especially traumatic, and improving their quality of life with social programs, meals, transportation, housing, and more. It is our sacred responsibility to care for Holocaust survivors so they can live with dignity, comfort, and independence.

Third Gen

Are you a third generation survivor or supporter? We offer meaningful, year-round programming for grandchildren of Holocaust survivors as well as other young professionals who are passionate about Holocaust remembrance and education Learn more.

Watch past Third Gen programs here.

Helping Survivors Access Vaccines

Months of lockdown during the pandemic triggered memories of early trauma for many Holocaust survivors. So getting a vaccine meant one thing: Liberation. To make sure survivors got their shots as quickly and easily as possible, we coordinated pop-up vaccine sites across New York and provided funding for transportation to and from appointments.

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Our Impact

  • More than 28,000 Holocaust survivors in New York and Israel receive life-enhancing services through our Community Initiative for Holocaust Survivors.

  • 82,400 Holocaust survivors and seniors in the former Soviet Union receive services.

  • More than 2,700 Holocaust survivors received vaccines facilitated by UJA.

  • Nearly $7 million dedicated to meet the needs of the last generation of Holocaust survivors.

Witness Theater

We’re keeping survivors’ memories alive through programs like Witness Theater. This intergenerational program brings survivors together with high school students. Over the course of many months, survivors share their stories, which the students then perform before an audience. On Long Island, UJA's Witness Project offers both a performance and a fine arts dimension.

Read a message from our CEO about this program’s urgent purpose keyboard_arrow_right

Support our Community Initiative for
Holocaust Survivors